Copyright Use-Cases

Use Case 1: Online delivery of text

Typical Uses

      1. Posting newspaper clippings
      2. Posting journal articles, book chapters
      3. Posting text-based materials (e.g. Blackboard, PowerPoint, web sites, etc.)

Guidelines of use

      1. Faculty members hold the copyright to all self-constructed lecture materials
      2. Scanning/digitizing analog works only when material is, “used solely for authorized transmissions, and when a digital version of a work is unavailable or protected by technological measures”(IV.a.i)
      3. Use of text materials “in a manner analogous to performances and displays in live classroom settings” (IV.f.i)
      4. Scanning and distribution of text materials in a manner consistent with Fair Use statutes & e-reserve guidelines (IV.b.i, IV.g.i)
        • Reproduction of text material for the same class and faculty member beyond 1 semester require permission
      5. Delivery of “reasonable and limited” portions of text within a “class session” is allowed, assuming:
        • Use in an SEU educational setting
        • Limited access to enrolled students
        • Use of technology that limits the ability to easily copy material
        • Copyright notice is given to students
        • Access to the material is removed past the “class session”
        • Intention to “show”, and not to distribute copyrighted content

Prohibitions (examples only)

      1. “Textbooks or other digital content provided under license from the author, publisher, aggregator or other entity” (IV.a.i)
      2. Physical distribution of copyrighted materials (i.e. no course packs)
      3. Copyrighted content made available to students for the entire semester

References

    1. Campus Guide to Copyright Compliance:
    2. Fair Use Guidelines for Electronic Reserve Systems @ UT
    3. American Library Association:
    4. Teach Act – Best practices Using Blackboard
    5. TEACH Act: (Summarized by the University of Texas)
    6. NCSU’s Teach Act Glossary
    7. SEU Copy Center

 

Use Case 2: Traditional use of text

Typical Uses

  1. Display of newspaper clippings
  2. Display of journal articles and book chapters
  3. Distribution of journal articles and book chapters

Guidelines of use

  1. Faculty members hold the copyright to all self-constructed lecture materials
  2. Display of text materials to support in-class lectures
  3. Reproduction (photocopying, scanning, etc) and distribution of text materials in a manner consistent with Fair Use statutes & e-reserve guidelines
  4. Reproduction of text materials for the same class and faculty member beyond 1 semester require copyright permission
  5. Use of systems such as Blackboard do not change this requirement

Prohibitions (examples only)

  1. Physical distribution of copyrighted materials (i.e. no course packs without permission)
  2. Copyrighted content originally displayed in class that is made available to students for the entire semester

References

  1. Copyright Clearance Center (CCC) – Guide to Fair Use
  2. CCC’s Campus Guide to Copyright Compliance:
  3. UT’s Crash Course in Copyright
  4. Fair Use Guidelines for Electronic Reserve Systems @ UT
  5. Teach Act – Best practices Using Blackboard

 

Use Case 3: Online delivery of images and graphics

Typical Uses

  1. Posting cartoons
  2. Posting photographs, illustrations, & instructional graphics
  3. Multimedia-delivery of materials (e.g. via Blackboard, PowerPoint, web sites, etc.)

Guidelines of use

  1. Faculty members hold the copyright to all self-constructed lecture materials
  2. Scanning/digitizing analog works only when material is, “used solely for authorized transmissions, and when a digital version of a work is unavailable or protected by technological measures”(IV.a.i)
  3. Use of graphic materials “in a manner analogous to performances and displays in live classroom settings” (IV.f.i)
  4. Scanning/digitizing images and graphics in a manner consistent with Fair Use statutes
  5. Delivery of “reasonable and limited” amounts of images within a “class session” is allowed, assuming:
    • Use in an SEU educational setting
    • Limited access to enrolled students
    • Use of technology that limits the ability to easily copy material
    • Copyright notice is given to students
    • Access to the material is removed past the “class session”
    • Intention to “show”, and not to distribute copyrighted content

Prohibitions (examples only)

  1. “Textbooks or other digital content provided under license from the author, publisher, aggregator or other entity” (IV.a.i)
  2. Physical distribution of copyrighted materials (i.e. no continuous posting of copyrighted photos)
  3. Copyrighted content made available to students for the entire semester

References

  1. Campus Guide to Copyright Compliance:
  2. Fair Use Guidelines for Electronic Reserve Systems @ UT
  3. American Library Association:
  4. Teach Act – Best practices Using Blackboard
  5. TEACH Act: (Summarized by the University of Texas)
  6. NCSU’s Teach Act Glossary

 

Use Case 4: Traditional use of images and graphics

Typical Uses

  1. Display of cartoons
  2. Display of photographs, illustrations, & instructional graphics
  3. Multimedia-delivery of materials (e.g. via Blackboard, PowerPoint, web sites, etc.)

Guidelines of use

  1. Faculty members hold the copyright to all self-constructed lecture materials
  2. Display of images and graphic materials to support in-class lectures
  3. Reproduction (photocopying, scanning, downloading) and distribution of images and graphics in a manner consistent with Fair Use statutes & e-reserve guidelines
    • Reproduction of images and graphics for the same class and instructor beyond 1 semester require copyright permission
    • Use of systems such as Blackboard do not change this requirement

Prohibitions (examples only)

  1. Physical distribution of copyrighted materials (i.e. no continuous posting of copyrighted images and graphics)
  2. Copyrighted content originally displayed in class that is made available to students for the entire semester

References

  1. Copyright Clearance Center (CCC) – Guide to Fair Use
  2. CCC’s Campus Guide to Copyright Compliance:
  3. UT’s Crash Course in Copyright
  4. Fair Use Guidelines for Electronic Reserve Systems @ UT
  5. Teach Act – Best practices Using Blackboard

 

Use Case 5: Online delivery of audio & video

Typical Uses

  1. Delivery of recorded lectures
  2. Delivery of audio/video segments from source material

Guidelines of use

  1. Faculty members hold the copyright to all self-recordings of lecture materials
  2. Use audio/video materials “in a manner analogous to performances and displays in live classroom settings” (IV.c.i)
  3. Scanning/digitizing audio and video in a manner consistent with Fair Use statutes
  4. Delivery of “reasonable and limited” portions of audio / video within a “class session” is allowed, assuming:
    • Use in an SEU educational setting
    • Limited access to enrolled students
    • Use of technology that limits the ability to easily copy material
    • Copyright notice is given to students
    • Access to the material is removed past the “class session”
    • Intention to “show”, and not to distribute copyrighted content

Prohibitions (examples only)

  1. Physical distribution of copyrighted audio/video materials (e.g. giving away DVDs)
  2. Online distribution of easily downloadable .mp3’s of copyrighted content (e.g. from file sharing or related sources)
  3. Copyrighted content made available to students for the entire semester

References

  1. American Library Association
  2. TEACH Act: (Summarized by the University of Texas)
  3. NCSU’s Teach Act Glossary

 

Use Case 6: Traditional use of audio & video

Typical Uses

  1. Performance of audio and video in class (DVD, audio cd, or other formats)
  2. Delivery of recorded lectures as homework
  3. Multimedia-delivery of materials (e.g. via Blackboard, PowerPoint, web sites, etc.)

Guidelines of use

  1. Faculty members hold the copyright to all self-recordings of lecture materials
  2. Display of audio and video materials to support in-class lectures (all formats)
  3. Use of media recordings (i.e. audio & video recordings, off-air broadcasts, etc.) in a manner consistent with Fair Use statutes & library copyright guidelines
  4. Reproduction (digitizing, downloading) and distribution of audio and video in a manner consistent with Fair Use statutes & e-reserve guidelines
    • Distribution of audio and video content for the same class and instructor beyond 1 semester require copyright permission
    • Use of systems such as Blackboard do not change this requirement
  5. Delivery of “reasonable and limited” portions of audio / video within a “class session” is allowed, assuming:
    • Use in an SEU educational setting
    • Limited access to enrolled students
    • Use of technology that limits the ability to easily copy material
    • Copyright notice is given to students
    • Access to the material is removed past the “class session”
    • Intention to “show”, and not to distribute copyrighted content

Prohibitions (examples only)

  1. Textbooks or other digital content provided under license from the author, publisher, aggregator or other entity.
  2. Conversion of materials from analog to digital formats, except when the converted material is used solely for authorized transmissions and when a digital version of a work is unavailable or protected by technological measures.
  3. Physical distribution of copyrighted audio/video materials (e.g. giving away DVDs)
  4. Online distribution of easily downloadable .mp3’s of copyrighted content (e.g. from file sharing or related sources)
  5. Copyrighted content made available to students for the entire semester

References

  1. American Library Association:
  2. TEACH Act: (Summarized by the University of Texas)
  3. Copyright Clearance Center (CCC) – Guide to Fair Use
  4. CCC’s Campus Guide to Copyright Compliance:
  5. UT’s Crash Course in Copyright
  6. Fair Use Guidelines for Electronic Reserve Systems @ UT
  7. Teach Act – Best practices Using Blackboard